WWLP Cook: Cocktail Meatballs with Horseradish Sauce

This recipe comes from McCall’s Cocktail-Time Cookbook and was intended for cocktail parties year round.

 

cocktail meatballs

Ingredients

  • 3/4 lb ground chuck
  • 2 T raw quick-cooking oats
  • 1/2 t ginger
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t monosodium glutamate
  • 2 T milk
  • 1/2 t onion powder
  • 1 can (3oz) whole mushrooms, drained

For the sauce:

  • 1 cup dairy sour cream
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/8 t pepper
  • 2 t prepared horesradish

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350*
  2. Toss chuck with oats, ginger, egg, salt, monosodium glutamate, milk, and onion powder; toss lightly to combine
  3. Form mixture into 1-inch balls; press mushroom into center of each
  4. Place meatballs in single layer in shallow baking pan. Bake 12 minutes
  5. Meanwhile, make Sauce: Combine all ingredients in small saucepan. Heat gently; do not boil
  6. Spear meatballs with a wooden pick; dip into warm sauce

Makes 6 Servings

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WWLP Entertain: Vintage Dorothy Thorpe Vintage Punchbowl

This Dorothy Thorpe punch bowl is now mine. I am probably far more obsessed with it than any woman buying this in the 1960’s ever was. Dorothy Thorpe was a popular glassware designer and a lot of her glass sets were sold in higher end department stores throughout mid-century America.

dorothy thorpe punch bowl set

There are TONS of similar sets available on ebay and etsy and surprisingly a lot of them are in perfect condition. I picked this one up at an antique mall in the Fox Lake area. The glasses on this set are more cylindrical than the more famous (thanks to Mad Men) roly poly style–which is also abundantly available online and at antique stores.

Dinner Parties 101: The Guest List

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In 1963 the Amy Vanderbilt Success Program for Women published How to Give Successful Dinner Parties (by Adele Whitely Fletcher)–a book that was part of a series of lifestyle manuals aimed at teaching housewives the right etiquette, the right hosting techniques, and the right decorum for her daily life in and out of the home. Throwing a party guest list together may seem like a quick cross off on the to-do list, but according to the Amy Vanderbilt Success Program there are 5 rules that must be followed before sending out the invitations:

  1. Don’t ask everyone you know! Although everyone knows that a successful dinner party involves an eclectic gathering of friends, rather than invite your entire address book, “Better to give two parties, one for social friends and one for business friends who, even though they may not all know one another, will be likely to have some interest in common.
  2. Invite a few talkers. “Quiet, thoughtful people can be very wonderful. But a party entirely or even largely composed of them is not likely to be.”
  3. Invite an equal number of men and women. “Do the women you are inviting too heavily outnumber the men?…One or two new men, even though they are married men whose wives, for one adequate reason or another, cannot be present, will prove a boon.”
  4. Don’t invite guests that have beef with each other. “A dinner party is no place to risk embarrassing situations or to attempt to patch up differences.”
  5. Don’t invite more people than you can comfortably entertain.

Once you’ve figured out the guest list, you can then proceed to organizing the invitations and start planning the menu and time table of preparation. And if you find that you’ve been guilty of making some of these mistakes, the Amy Vanderbilt Success Program wants you to know that just as experienced hostesses have been able to right their wrongs, so can you!

WWLP Cook: Pineapple and Strawberry Pinwheels

These recipes would be used for a ladies luncheon or a tea party. Today they’d be best used at the same type of event or any type of shower-bridal, engagement, or baby.

Strawberry Pinwheels

You’ll need fresh, unsliced bread for these dainties. Order it a day ahead, as most bread delivered to supermarkets come sliced.

Makes 6 to 7 dozen sandwiches

Ingredients:

  • 2 packages (8 ounces each) cream cheese
  • 2 cups strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced
  • 2 tabelspons 10X (confectioner’s powdered) sugar
  • 1 loaf unsliced white bread

Directions:

  1. Soften cream cheese in medium-size bowl; gradually blend in strawberries and 10X sugar until smoothly spreadable.
  2. Cut crusts from load of bread, then slice bread lengthwise into 9 or 10 thin slices; cover with a dampened towel; let stand 10 minutes.
  3. Spread slices, 1 at a time, with cheese mixture, using 3 to 4 tabelspoons per slice; roll up, jelly-roll fashion; wrap tightly in waxed paper, transparent saran, or foil; chill at least 2 hours.
  4. To serve, unwrap and slice each roll crosswise into 7 or 8 pinwheels.

Hostess note: Use your sharpest knife, for bread must be sliced thinly and evenly. We found it easier to cut crusts from bottom and 2 longer sides, leaving top and 2 short sides to hold onto, and then trim the short crusts. When you slice rolls, wipe knife between each cutting so filling will not smear. For 100, make 2 to 3 times the recipe, depending on the varieties of other sandwiches in your tea menu.

Pineapple Pinwheels

Makes 6 to 7 dozen sandwiches

Ingredients:

  • 1 loaf unsliced whole -wheat bread
  • 2 jars (5 ounces each) pineapple-cheese spread, softened

Directions:

  1. cut all crusts from load of bread, then slice bread lenghtwise into 9 or 10 thin slices; cover with a dampened towel; let stand 10 minutes.
  2. spread slices, 1 at a time, with softened cheese spread; roll up, jelly-roll fashion; wrap tightly in waxed paper, transparent saran, or foil; chill at least 2 hours
  3. To serve, unwrap and slice each roll crosswise into 7 or 8 pinwheels

Hostess note: For 100, make 2 to 3 times the recipe, depending on the varieties of other sandwiches in your tea menu


Everywoman’s Family Circle May 1960