WWLP Cook: Fruit Crown

This recipe comes from a 1961 joint advertisement for Eagle Brand Condensed Milk and Minute Tapioca:

Tapioca Fruit Crown 1961

Fruit Crown

Ingredients:

  • 1 envelope (1 tablespoon) gelatin
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/3 cups (15-oz. can) Eagle Brand Sweetened Condensed Milk
  • 6 tablespoons Minute Tapioca
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 2 teaspoons grated lemon rind
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 cup whipped cream (optional)

Directions:

  1. Sprinkle gelatin over 1/2 cup of the water; set aside to soften gelatin.
  2. Combine remaining water, Eagle Brand Condensed Milk, Minute Tapioca, egg yolks, lemon rind, and salt in saucepan. Let stand 5 minutes. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture comes just to a full boil.
  3. Remove from heat. Add softened gelatin, stirring until it is thoroughly dissolved. Add vanilla.
  4. Beat egg whites until foamy. Gradually add sugar and continue beating until soft peaks form.
  5. Very slowly add the tapioca mixture, stirring rapidly to blend well.
  6. Chill about 1/2 hour; then fold in whipped cream.
  7. Pour into a lightly oiled shallow 2-quart mold. Chill 3 hours or until firm. Unmold.
  8. Serve with your favorite fruit if desired

Makes 10-12 servings

Note: For deep 2-quart molds, increase gelatin to 1 1/2 tablespoons.

##

Advertisements

WWLP Cook: International Buffet Menu

Perched happily on cushions, your guests will enjoy this array of foods from many lands: Three tiers of appetizers to go with punch, showy pancake surprise, exotic guacamole-topped salad–followed by a delectable dessert and coffee

towerInternational Buffet

Round-the-world Appetizers

Punch

Fiesta Pancake Tower

Grapefruit-Guacamole Salad

Hot Rolls

Butter

Carioca Cream

Coffee


Everywoman’s Family Circle Feb 1960

Childhood Obesity: Also a problem in 1961

20150813-104507.jpg

It’s fascinating to me that so often the current obesity epidemic and push to end childhood obesity is promoted as a new thing or a timely campaign unique to the 2000’s….but childhood obesity was a known problem even back in 1961.

According to the article “The too-plump child may need your help” in the August 1961 issue of Everywoman’s Family Circle numerous studies had been done to examine the relationship with obesity in childhood and obesity as an adult.

According to one study, “a survey of an Eastern city’s high school students revealed that 20% of these boys and girls were at least 10% above the average weights for their ages.” Another study from Boston looked at primary and secondary school students to find that more than 10% of the study participants were more than 20% heavier than the average weight for their ages.

It was also estimated that about 15% of children and teens nationwide were obese (according to a study done by Dr. Felix Heald, the former president of Pediatrics at Harvard and the Washington D.C children’s hospital). Today most states in America are estimated at about 20-30% obesity for children in the 10-17 age range.

The article goes on to explain the correlation of obesity in childhood and obesity in adulthood providing statistics that in a study of 200 adults, 43/50 adult men who had been obese as children were still obese vs 21/50 adult men who had been average weight as children than were overweight as adults. Additional studies were cited to argue that most obese adults were also obese as children.

Hypothyroidism is mentioned as a common suggestion for weight gain, but quickly shoots it down as a viable option stating that although it’s popular to assume, hypothyroidism rarely causes obesity in children. Obesity in children is further connected to diet and inactivity, along with parental involvement in enabling obesity–essentially the same issues we find today.

According to the article and unnamed sources (vaguely describe as authorities), 10% of children with normal weight parents are obese, 50% of children with one obese parent are obese, and 80% of children with two obese parents are obese. Obesity is described as a family trait, but explained that it is not inherited; rather it is learned through environment.

The article includes case studies of the experiences of a 10 year old boy and 8 year old girl in school, along with a study of teenage girls at what ultimately would be referred to as a “fat camp”. And while it is not socially acceptable to fat-shame in 2015, very direct language was used at this time as a tactic to establish social norms, motivate, and essentially scare the fat out of you. The article rarely uses sugar coated phrasing for “over weight” and describes the overweight child as “fat”, “fatty”, and “porker”. The article even goes so far as to state that in a group of obese teen girls surveyed, the few who claimed to be okay with or positive about their conditions were “pathetically defensive.”

While the issue is still the same, the language used is a far cry from what you might read in a magazine or website today–unless you’re reading a comment thread on the Internet.

WWLP Wear: Radiant Fashions for your Summer 1961

In a woman’s world variety is the spice of summer-life fashions, as these photographs suggest. Dresses and playwear in a profusion of tempting colors are sparked with equally colorful accessories

"An all-purpose dress of this type, simply stated is perfect for summer-long wear. The motif: A refreshing fern print in shades of green on white. Solid-green piping outlines the back-plunged neckline and armholes. A corded belt of matching green ties in front. Available only in the coloring pictured. Sized are 8-16. About $35. Designed by Eddy George for Casual Time. Bracelet is by Monet"

“An all-purpose dress of this type, simply stated is perfect for summer-long wear. The motif: A refreshing fern print in shades of green on white. Solid-green piping outlines the back-plunged neckline and armholes. A corded belt of matching green ties in front. Available only in the coloring pictured. Sized are 8-16. About $35. Designed by Eddy George for Casual Time. Bracelet is by Monet”

"This delectable dress, sheer and cool, is made in a new Celanese fortrel-and-cotton fabric. SMocking trims the bodice and cap sleeves. The dress comes fully lined in its own color. You have a choice of coral, yellow, green, natural, or black. Sizes 8-18. Priced at about $45. Made by Sportations. The Necklace and earrings are designed by Sandor Goldberger."

“This delectable dress, sheer and cool, is made in a new Celanese fortrel-and-cotton fabric. SMocking trims the bodice and cap sleeves. The dress comes fully lined in its own color. You have a choice of coral, yellow, green, natural, or black. Sizes 8-18. Priced at about $45. Made by Sportations. The Necklace and earrings are designed by Sandor Goldberger.”

"On a summer evening you'll be enchanting in a dress such as this. Its soft-textured silk top has small windowpane cutouts and bows at the back, short sash ends in front. The bouffant skirt of embroidered silk organza has an airy quality--perfect for dancing. Color combination is blue-and-white or orange-and-white. Sizes 8-16. About $55. Made by De Michel Originals. Necklace and earrings by Laguna."

“On a summer evening you’ll be enchanting in a dress such as this. Its soft-textured silk top has small windowpane cutouts and bows at the back, short sash ends in front. The bouffant skirt of embroidered silk organza has an airy quality–perfect for dancing. Color combination is blue-and-white or orange-and-white. Sizes 8-16. About $55. Made by De Michel Originals. Necklace and earrings by Laguna.”

 "One of the best-liked of current fashions is the two-piece middy dress. The attractive version pictured here is in spun rayon. A notched hem and simulated pockets add interest to the top. Color is yellow, mint, turquoise, or melon, with white piping. In sizes 8-20. Under $15. A Miss Brett Design. Jewelry is by Marvella"

“One of the best-liked of current fashions is the two-piece middy dress. The attractive version pictured here is in spun rayon. A notched hem and simulated pockets add interest to the top. Color is yellow, mint, turquoise, or melon, with white piping. In sizes 8-20. Under $15. A Miss Brett Design. Jewelry is by Marvella”

"What could be more appropriate to wear in your leisure hours than this two-piecer of Celanese tricot? The brief sleeve top has a banded boat-shape neckline and a pleated front panel. Knife pleating gives fullness to the bias-cut skirt. Color is white, turquoise, pink, lemon, lilac, or navy. In sized 8-18. The top is under $9; the skirt, under $13. Designed by Koret."

“What could be more appropriate to wear in your leisure hours than this two-piecer of Celanese tricot? The brief sleeve top has a banded boat-shape neckline and a pleated front panel. Knife pleating gives fullness to the bias-cut skirt. Color is white, turquoise, pink, lemon, lilac, or navy. In sized 8-18. The top is under $9; the skirt, under $13. Designed by Koret.”

 


Everywoman’s Family Circle May 1961

WWLP Cook: Boiled-Beef Dinner and Beef-Pie Dinner

The February 1960 issue of Everywoman’s Family Circle included a two page spread explaining the best way to handle left over meats (because much like today, larger quantities of meats were typically more cost and time effective despite being too much for dinner). The article suggested that no meat would go uneaten if the homemaker had an advance plan for how to use the leftovers and provided menus for tonight’s dinner AND a “planned-over” left over meal. The first menu offered was a beef dinner.

Old-fashioned boiled beef: 

“It’s a man’t favorite–succulent boiled beef with a smacking-hot horseradish sauce.” For the first meal the mag chose an arm pot roast with round bone in (brisket, bottom round, blade, or rump are also suggested as good alternative cuts) and for the left-over meal they chose ground meat “because boiled beef at its best falls apart at a fork’s touch”

Boiled Beef Dinner Menu

Boiled beef dinner

Old-fashioned Boiled Beef

Brown Horseradish Sauce

Buttered Boiled Whole Potatoes

Crisp-cooked Cabbage Wedges

Apple Betty          Whipped Cream

Coffee                      Milk

Planned-Over Menu

Beef pie dinner

Beef-‘n’-potato Pie

Creamed Lima Beans and Celery

Winter Tomato Salad (use canned whole tomatoes)

Tea                Cherry Pie                   Milk

These might be too large of menus to prepare for a weeknight meal for two, but I do think it would be worth it to plan ahead and have a left-over meal planned for the extra meats!

 

 

Cocktail Parties 101: What Every Hostess Should Always Have on Hand

According to the McCall’s Cocktail Time Cookbook (1965) to throw the best cocktail parties hostesses should follow these three tips of advice…

1.Have lots of ashtrays, and put them everywhere.

Plentiful ashtrays mean no one will be putting their cigarette out on your lawn or in their mostly finished Manhattan–good for you–but it also means your guest knows you have them in mind–good for them.

 

2. And, if possible, have about twice as many glasses as guests; otherwise you’ll be washing glasses during most of the party.

Again, good for you because you will have less work to do during the party, and good for your guests because they won’t have to wait around for their next drink while you’re doing the dishes. This piece also speaks to the post-war consumer culture that continued to blossom into the 1960s. The type of people these books were aimed at were white, middle class women. They had enough money to spend frivolously if they chose and that meant they could have a few sets of glasses on hand if they so desired.

3. Put coasters on every flat surface that could be harmed by moisture.

This is really just a good for the hostess tip. Protect your surfaces at all cost because a guest who leaves a ring on your antique coffee table probably won’t be offering to fix it the next morning. The more coasters available, the more likely guests are to use them.

When throwing a cocktail party, not only do you want to make things as easy for you as possible, but you also want to make your guests as comfortable as possible.