WWLP Wear: Fashion for College Co-eds during WWII

Leotards were all the rage throughout college campuses in 1943. That’s not so different than today’s longstanding craze for leggings and lounge wear, although we certainly style it a little differently now!

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Acrobats’ tights make news in this year’s college fashions” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

‘Mademoiselle’ suggests short leotards, ‘smooth as a second skin…wear with, long or short skirts” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

‘Vogue’ cover features this “polydxtrous gray flannel suit” modeled bu Anne Norring, ‘typical campus-citizen-of-the-world.’ Pretty Anne has never been to college.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Chinese influence is sponsored by Mademoiselle. This outfit, called Nightshift (but obviously not for sleeping), has a coolie coat of striped cotton and velveteen slacks.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

‘We’re mad for the plaid’ writes Mademoiselle in college jargon of this outfit. ‘It’s so snazzy for this fringed-in-front skirt, cut slim (…ixnay on fullness) and short.'” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Turtle-neck sweaters of wool are a Harper’s Bazaar suggestion for girls who want to wear cotton pinafores to college. Sweaters may be worn under pinafore or jumper.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Waves havelock is, according to Harper’s Bazaar, “something.” College issue rated many “somethings,” ended with “Anything is never as good as SOMETHING.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

“Felt hat, like little boy’s cap, was ‘dreamed up for you by Betsy Tyree of Virginia Intermont College,’ according to Mademoiselle. Here cap is worn by Barbara Luff.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

“Skullcap of green felt has red wool border and tassel. Fashion magazines show caps, bumpers, berets and beanies with college clothes, ignore the popular head kerchief.” Image via Life Magazine Sept 13, 1943

WWLP Cook: Cocktail Meatballs with Horseradish Sauce

This recipe comes from McCall’s Cocktail-Time Cookbook and was intended for cocktail parties year round.

 

cocktail meatballs

Ingredients

  • 3/4 lb ground chuck
  • 2 T raw quick-cooking oats
  • 1/2 t ginger
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/2 t monosodium glutamate
  • 2 T milk
  • 1/2 t onion powder
  • 1 can (3oz) whole mushrooms, drained

For the sauce:

  • 1 cup dairy sour cream
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 1/8 t pepper
  • 2 t prepared horesradish

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350*
  2. Toss chuck with oats, ginger, egg, salt, monosodium glutamate, milk, and onion powder; toss lightly to combine
  3. Form mixture into 1-inch balls; press mushroom into center of each
  4. Place meatballs in single layer in shallow baking pan. Bake 12 minutes
  5. Meanwhile, make Sauce: Combine all ingredients in small saucepan. Heat gently; do not boil
  6. Spear meatballs with a wooden pick; dip into warm sauce

Makes 6 Servings

WWLP Entertain: Vintage Dorothy Thorpe Vintage Punchbowl

This Dorothy Thorpe punch bowl is now mine. I am probably far more obsessed with it than any woman buying this in the 1960’s ever was. Dorothy Thorpe was a popular glassware designer and a lot of her glass sets were sold in higher end department stores throughout mid-century America.

dorothy thorpe punch bowl set

There are TONS of similar sets available on ebay and etsy and surprisingly a lot of them are in perfect condition. I picked this one up at an antique mall in the Fox Lake area. The glasses on this set are more cylindrical than the more famous (thanks to Mad Men) roly poly style–which is also abundantly available online and at antique stores.

Vogue’s Book of Etiquette (1948): Thanks to a Stranger

The 1948 edition of Vogue’s Book of Etiquette contains over 600 pages of etiquette rules for daily life and special events. While a lot of the social conventions of the 40’s were out of date by the time the 60’s happened, they are nonetheless fun to read about! So Laura Petrie might not have followed all of these rules, but she certainly would have had parents that did (or at least tried to).

Thanks to a Stranger (p. 35)

Women must thank all those, including strangers, who do them little services.

This means that if someone holds a door for you or lets you skip the line ahead of them, a woman must always say ‘thank you’. If someone does something nice for you and you say your thanks, but THEN they try to start a conversation with you, you can politely and discreetly decline their conversation. However,

…it is more attractive to take for granted that the gesture was motivated by politeness only than it is immediately to suspect another motive. One should never be afraid to be kind, or to put a generous interpretation on the actions of others.

Always give the benefit of the doubt. Just because someone strikes a conversation with you doesn’t mean they are automatically a perv or trying to pull one over on you.

It is better to risk a little trouble than to risk a narrow, ungenerous habit of mind.

Ultimately a woman should never risk her manners in the name of “what-ifs” or general safety. Always give the benefit of the doubt because to do otherwise would be egregious.

 

Vogue’s Book of Etiquette (1948): The Ideal Attitude

The 1948 edition of Vogue’s Book of Etiquette contains over 600 pages of etiquette rules for daily life and special events. While a lot of the social conventions of the 40’s were out of date by the time the 60’s happened, they are nonetheless fun to read about! So Laura Petrie might not have followed all of these rules, but she certainly would have had parents that did (or at least tried to).

The Ideal Attitude  (p.33)

The ideal attitude which should underlie all women’s manners expresses kindness, gentleness, good will, sensitive understanding, self-respect and, when it is appropriate, deference.

So, the ideal woman is pleasant and submissive. When you read articles on the internet about how people need to stop telling women to ‘smile more’ (check out this art project called “Stop telling women to smile”) this is what those articles are attacking. While everyone should be pleasant and have others in mind, Vogue described manners for men a few pages earlier by declaring,

…noticeably good manners, according to the Anglo-American standard, are almost unattractive in a man. (p.25)

Instead, men should be discreet with their politeness and never be noticeably concerned for decorum.

The double standard in male and female roles during the 1940s was quite drastic (as is visible in this book). But let’s not forget that at this time it was completely acceptable to hold people to these standards.

WWLP Bake: Betty Crocker’s Custard Chiffon Cake

This recipe comes from a joint advertisement for Betty Crocker and Gold Medal Enriched Flour in 1953. The version shown serves as the back cover for the July 1953 issue of Better Homes and Gardens:

Betty Crocker Chiffon Custard Cake

“New! Custard Chiffon Cake//As rich tasting as butter cake…delicate as angel food//Betty Crocker says: ‘Flour is the most important ingredient in any baking'”

Betty Crocker’s Custard Chiffon Cake (Makes 16-20 Servings)

Blend together and then cool:

  •  3/4 cup scalding hot milk
  • 7 egg yolks, slightly beaten

Preheat oven (see pan sizes and temperatures below). Sift an ample amount of GOLD MEDAL FLOUR onto a square of paper

STEP 1….Measure (level measurements throughout) and sift together into  mixing bowl:

  • 2 cups sifted GOLD MEDAL flour (spoon lightly into cup, don’t pack)
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar
  • *3 tsp. baking powder
  • *1 tsp salt

Make a well and add in order:

  • 1/2 cup cooking (salad) oil such as wesson
  • 2 tsp. vanilla
  • the cooled egg yolk-milk mixture

Beat until smooth with spoon or beat with electric mixer on medium speed for 1 minute.

STEP 2…Measure into large mixing bowl:

  • 1 cup egg whites (7 or 8)
  • 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar

Beat until whites form very stiff peaks by hand or with electric mixer on high speed for 3 to 5 minutes. DO NOT UNDERBEAT. Egg whites are stiff enough when a dry rubber scraper drawn through them leaves a clean path.

STEP 3…Pour batter gradually over beaten egg whites–gently folding with rubber scraper just until blended. DO NOT STIR. Pour into ungreased pan immediately

BakeTube pan, 10×4-in.–325*–55 min. then –350*–10 to 15 minutes…or until top springs back when lightly touched.

Immediately turn pan upside down, placing tube part over neck of funnel or bottle, or resting edges of oblong pan on 2 other pans. Let hang, free of table, until cold. Loosen from sides and tube with spatula. Turn pan over and hit edge sharply on table to loosen. Frost with Fresh Strawberry Icing (recipe below).

Success Tip: Milk must be hot when poured over slightly beaten egg yolks.

*If you use GOLD MEDAL Self-Rising Flour (sold in parts of the South), omit baking powder and salt.

For altitudes over 2500 feet, use baking powder as follows; 2500-4000 ft. 2 1/4 tsp.; 4000-6500 ft. 1 1/2 tsp.; over 6500 ft. 3/4 tsp. Over 3500 ft. increase oven temp. 25* and use minimum baking time.

Fresh Strawberry Icing…Blend until fluffy and good spreading consistency: 6 tbsp. soft shortening, 3 cups sifted confectioner’s sugar, 3 tbsp. crushed fresh or frozen strawberries (including juice). Add additional crushed berries if icing appears to thick.

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